Kiriya 2012 – The Culture of Subversion and Russian Media Landscape

Kiriya 2012

This article examines the roots of piracy and underground media cultures in Russia during the Soviet era and its effect on today’s culture. Kiriya’s main observation argues that through the “non-formal tradition rules”, the Soviets experienced cultural growth through illegal means. However, with the fall of Communism, piracy was still somewhat permitted (Kiriya 452). It was during this time that piracy grew to unprecedented levels and today’s market is working to diminish those levels, meanwhile the desire for “non-formal rules” has grown due to new censorship methods. Kiriya’s connection of piracy in literature and the written word as a result of censorship follows a historical pattern dating back to the Imperial era is not a revelation, but his study does delve into why Russians have resorted to such tactics in order to retain a free flow of information, in certain cases.

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One thought on “Kiriya 2012 – The Culture of Subversion and Russian Media Landscape

  1. yu2me says:

    wow, I’ve been working with the author on other aspects of communications (within a conference that we’ve organized several years ago http://www.esarussia.ru/conference/2010/conference/participants/element.php?ELEMENT_ID=1644), and didn’t realize he was studying piracy too! Thanks for sharing!

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